Friday, May 16, 2014

Two Worthy Books: One on Immigration, the Other on Slavery

I have read two worthy books in the past two weeks, ones that I recommend.  They are:

1.  The Path to National Suicide - an Essay on Immigration and Multiculturalism, by Lawrence Auster.  This book explains how, due to liberal ideology, our borders were opened in 1965, and how the resulting transformation of America's ethnic composition helped fuel the ideology of multiculturalism which is changing the demographics of America in radical ways.  Auster does not argue that all non-European immigration be halted, but that it is occurring too much and too fast for new immigrants to be successfully assimilated into our Anglo-Saxon, Judeo-Christian culture.  The demographics of America prior to the 1965 immigration act should be restored and preserved, in order to retain our culture, forms of government and traditions.

I found the pamphlet very well written and argued.

2. The Myths of American Slavery, by Walter D. Kennedy.  The actual history of slavery in the United States includes the North's enormous culpability in the institution, as well as its hypocrisy.  The author convincingly refutes the many slanders and falsehoods about the Confederacy, the Southern states, and the myths about the institution of African slavery.  Note:  exposing the whole truth about slavery is not "defending slavery," so please don't go there.  If you adore Lincoln as a demi-god and like to repeat the simplistic falsehoods of the Northern Myth, you won't like this book -- and that's why you should read it.

There is no way you can honor, respect or admire the Yankee invasion of the South in 1861 without undermining your own freedom in the here and now.


Always On Watch said...

I think that I've read that second book. If this book is the one I'm thinking of, it's a must read. Will make a lot of people uncomfortable. Facts can indeed by uncomfortable things.

Always On Watch said...

BTW, we had quite a discussion in my Government class after some students read The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution. Students -- and their parents -- just couldn't accept some of the facts about Abraham Lincoln.